Using GSP Website

A website search that does not yield any information does not necessarily mean that GSP has no information about your family.  but just that none of the collections that are currently full-text searchable on our website have the surname listed.  Some of the collections are hand written or older and can not be read by search engines.  An option is to search by geographic location, check indexes.  If a name is common or can be used in sentences, for example: miles or black or buck, the results will be challenging to sift through.  Take different approaches and compare results.

We are an  organization that functions by part-time staff and volunteers.  We began rebuilding our website in late 2015 and are still adding collections to the site.  You can view a list of the public collections that we currently have online at https://genpa.org/public-collections/ and the member collections at https://genpa.org/member-collections/.  We strive whenever possible to convert our files to “searchable” using our website search option.  Some of our collections are of handwritten records and some have older typefaces that are not always readable by search engines, so you may want to browse through the collections individually to look for family names.

Our collections tend to be for the late 18th through mid-to-late 19th centuries.   An exception to this is the Mount Moriah Cemetery Database.  While this is only one cemetery, it is quite a large one, and includes deaths well into the mid- and late-20th century.  It is possible that someone in your family might be in this database.  The Mount Moriah database has a separate search at https://genpa.org/member-collections/mount-moriah-cemetery-database/

The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, like other genealogical societies, also has programs and services in addition to our online collections. We also have many books in our office Research Library and collections that are not yet online.   We can assist you with your research and guide you in your search for records about your family, particularly in Pennsylvania.  https://genpa.org/research/

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